mental health long term effects of the pandemic

The Long-Term Effects of the Pandemic

In light of May being Mental Health Awareness Month, it’s especially timely that several studies have recently come out about the long-term effects of the pandemic on the American population. Anxiety remains high, with more people reporting increasing mental health issues in 2021 than ever before.

We have prepared a resource for you to download and print for you or your employees. (The information provided was due in part from Doctegrity. Please read their entire article on LinkedIn.)

This pandemic has affected people’s mental health in three ways:

  • People experience anxiety about catching the virus or unknowingly carrying and affecting loved ones
  • Social isolation caused by lockdown increased loneliness
  • Increased financial pressure from job loss or worry about job loss led to increased anxiety and depression

We have created a helpful download of some mental health tips (there were donated by our associates Doctegrity. Please read the full article on mental health and the long-term effects of mental health and the pandemic.)

Although the pandemic seems to be easing in some areas, the imprint on the mental health of Americans during this time of so much uncertainty could conceivably have long-lasting effects if not addressed. Social isolation and physical distancing can also have marked effects on physical health. Deficiencies in social relationships are associated with a higher risk for coronary heart disease and stroke according to a study at Newcastle University. In another study published in The Journals of Gerontology, loneliness produced a 40% increase in the risk of dementia.

Many of these sources and pressures that spur mental health issues remain even though it’s been almost a year and a half since the onset of the pandemic. In a new poll by the American Psychiatric Association, 43% of adults say the pandemic has had a serious impact on their mental health, up from 37% in 2020, with younger adults being more apt to report serious mental health effects than older adults. By the numbers, Young adults (18-29 years old) (49%) and Hispanic/Latinos (50%) report being more anxious now than a year ago. Only 30% of those 65 or older say they feel more anxious than last year.

See below for more statistics about current anxiety levels and click on the picture to see the complete study from the APA.

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Parents also show increased concern on behalf of their children amidst the pandemic. More than half of adults with children say they are worried about the mental state of their children and 48% say the pandemic has caused mental health problems for one or more of their children, including minor problems for 29% and major problems for 19%. More than 20% of parents said they faced difficulty scheduling appointments for their child with a mental health professional.

Read the entire article on LinkedIn. Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels.

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